Best Of 2017: TV

Let's get the hard part out of the way first. Most Disappointing Top Of The Lake: China Girl  This just makes me really sad. I adored Jane Campion's New Zealand set noir miniseries when it aired back in 2013. It was a bizarre, atmospheric and compelling mystery with stunning cinematography and a brilliant central performance … Continue reading Best Of 2017: TV

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Best Of 2017: Albums

I've not listened to that many albums from 2017 because I'm a massive hipster but there were some gems that came out this year. Here are my top picks. 'Melodrama' Lorde This is a bit of a guilty pleasure pick for me I have to say. Like Lorde's debut (Pure Heroine) Melodrama is an atmospheric, brooding … Continue reading Best Of 2017: Albums

In Praise of Donna and Cameron, Halt and Catch Fire’s Most Compelling Duo

A really great piece on my favourite show of this year and its two most compelling characters

Ari Talks TV

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After an uneven and underwhelming first season, Halt and Catch Fire reinvented itself in its second year by making one simple change: it moved its female characters into the foreground. Hardware engineer Donna Clark and coding prodigy Cameron Howe teamed up to launch an online gaming company called Mutiny, and suddenly everything that had been lacking in the show’s first outing–consistent energy, strong emotional hooks, and a unique narrative–was realized by their partnership. Halt and Catch Fire became must-watch television, and it did so by moving women’s stories to the center.

From the beginning, Halt presented itself as a show about industry outsiders, people who had to fight through fierce professional competition in order to be taken seriously. But Joe and Gordon, whose working relationship was the focus of season one, weren’t exactly facing any systemic barriers to success. They were both white men who had already been given every opportunity…

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Uncharted The Lost Legacy’s Depiction of Women Feels Revolutionary.

*Major spoilers for The Lost Legacy* There's a small moment in Naughty Dog's Uncharted The Lost Legacy when treasurer hunter Chloe Frazer tells her partner, ex PMC leader Nadine Ross, that its 'actually nice to be working with a woman' to which Nadine replies 'too right, not many of us out here'. Maybe the treasure hunting … Continue reading Uncharted The Lost Legacy’s Depiction of Women Feels Revolutionary.

Cinemanarrative Dissonance: The Ludonarrative of Video Games and How We Can Apply That To Talking About Movies.

Some great analysis from my good friend The Hipster Llama. Give it a read 🙂

The Hipster Llama

SPOILER WARNING FOR; I, DANIEL BLAKE AND GREEN ROOM, MILD SPOILERS FOR BLADE RUNNER.

There’s a video by a YouTube channel Video Game Critic called Errant Signal, normally a channel which highlights individual games and does a more in-depth than most analysis of the said video game. The video is called Errant Signal – The Debate That Never Took Place, and it’s about how stupid the ludology/narratology debate as a thing is and how stupid it is that as a result, we need to use the term ‘ludo-narrative dissonance’.

Now, this isn’t an essay on video games but I still feel the need to quickly explain what ludo-narrative dissonance is. It’s very simple. Ludo is the latin for game, and narrative means story, so moving on logically from that, ludo-narrative dissonance is when the story of a game is not reflected by the gameplay. The example that coined this…

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